The Prevalence of Gender Communication in Social Media

By: Alicia Eckman, Kelsey Fisher, Talia Stifter
Concordia University, St. Paul
Advising Professor: Dr. Kim Flottemesch, PhD

The primary purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between online self-disclosure and perceived appeal and define characteristics that individuals find appealing and unappealing in online self-disclosure. The findings from this study reveal significant differences in gender communication that distinctly affect the perceptions of online social media profiles. Using Deborah Tannen’s Genderlect theory, these gender differences are explained.

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Anonymous Communication on the Internet and Trolling

By: Allison Klempka and Arielle Stimson
Concordia University, St. Paul
Advising Professor: Dr. Kim Flottemesch, PhD

Internet Trolls are an online subculture who participate in posting upsetting or shocking content, harassing users, and spreading false information for their own enjoyment. As of the time of this study, research is limited on the trolling culture, the perception of trolls, and trolling behavior. The researchers have investigated trolling culture, as well as conducted a study in which subjects were asked to relay their emotional reactions to a selection of online comments, and mark the comments they considered to be trolling behavior. The results were meant to discover whether subjects of different age generations differed in their perception and definition of trolls. The results clarified that trolling was frequently associated with poor behavior, although the degree of disapproval and definitions for trolling varied between age groups.

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A Feminist Analysis of the Film “The Hunger Games”

By Kristi Loobeek
Concordia University, St. Paul
Advising Professor: Dr. Alan Winegarden

The purpose of this paper was to analyze the appearance of feminism throughout The Hunger Games, especially when pertaining to the lead female character of Katniss Everdeen. The thesis of this paper is that, while characteristics of all three “waves” of feminism were present within the motion picture, third-wave feminism prevailed as most apparent.

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A Communication Analysis of Religion in Education

By:Cody Wilcoxson, Kelley Spencer, and Savannah Nolen
Concordia University, St. Paul
Advising Professor: Dr. Kim Flottemesch, PhD

The researchers chose to examine religion as a factor in the decision to attend a university and the way that students adapt communicatively to faith-based universities. The concept brought many aspects of communication into play, but only a specific group of theories were applicable to the research findings. The researchers selected two theories to help explain the data: Communication Accommodation Theory and Symbolic Interactionism Theory. Both, Communication Accommodation Theory and Symbolic Interactionism Theory, focus on the decision-making and adaptation aspects of the study.

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